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Mediterranean Language Review 28 (2021)
journal:
volume: 28 (2021)
pages/dimensions: IV, 207 pages, 2 ill., 2 maps, 14 tables
language: deutsch, englisch
binding: Paperback
dimensions: 17,00 × 24,00 cm
edition: annual
publishing date: 15.12.2021
prices: ca. 99,00 Eur[D]
ISBN: 978-3-447-18112-9
The Mediterranean Language Review is an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed forum for the investigation of language and culture in the Mediterranean. Articles, reviews and review articles address issues relating to multiple aspects of Mediterranean languages, past and present. Among these are essays discussing linguistic contact and diffusion in the Mediterranean area and its hinterland, as well as interaction of language and culture in the region. Sociolinguistic aspects, religion and language, and linguistic stratification with areal typology and the languages of the Mediterranean littoral are focused on. Finally, the historical evolution and present state of languages spoken by small nations and ethnic minorities, ethnolinguistic studies on island communities in the Mediterranean, the interlinguas Kultursprachen and Mediterranean Lingua Franca, as well as approaches to Mediterranean lexicology sum up the journal’s objects of study.


From the contents (altogether about 6 contributions):
Peter Mackridge, Borrowing and Code Switching in Eighteenth-Century Phanariot Greek
Shkumbin Munishi, The Decrease of Albanian-Serbian Bilingualism in Kosovo
Marija Mandić, Fractal Recursivity in Monolingual Nationalism: Rejecting Hungarian in the Serbian Ethno-Confessional Schools
Giuliano Mion, The Arabic Dialect of Ben Gardane (Tunisia): Some Observations
Rimon Wehbi, Zwei neuwestaramäische Texte über die Wassermühlen in Maalula (Syrien)
Eleni Karantzol & Anatoli Theodoridi & Konstantinos Sampanis, The Interplay of External and Sociolinguistic Factors in Contact-Induced Language Change: Cappadocian Greek as a Case Study

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